Ferdinand de Saussure (play /sɔːˈsʊr/ or /sˈsʊr/; French pronunciation: [fɛʁdinɑ̃ də sosyʁ]; 26 November 1857 – 22 February 1913) was a Swiss linguist whose ideas laid a foundation for many significant developments in linguistics in the 20th century. He is widely considered one of the fathers of 20th-century linguistics.[1][2] However, most modern linguists and philosophers of language consider his ideas outdated.[3]While Saussure's concepts—particularly semiotics—have received little to no attention in modern linguistic textbooks,[4] his ideas have significantly influenced the humanities and social sciences

Ferdinand de Saussure
Full name Ferdinand de Saussure
Born 26 November 1857(1857-11-26)
Geneva, Switzerland
Died 22 February 1913(1913-02-22) (aged 55)
Vufflens-le-Château, Vaud, Switzerland
Era 19th-century philosophy
Region Western Philosophy
School Structuralism, semiotics
Main interests Linguistics
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